can be used to create magical fireballs, vortex dimensional portals, or to draw the player's attention to a glowing treasure chest.

Contents

Unity 2D animation Free e-library
One of the main ways to create effects is using animated sprites

One of the main ways to create effects is using animated sprites. For this, a prefab of the object is prepared, which must be added to the map.

Particle Effects are a unique tool to add interactivity and responsiveness to your game. They are excellent for creating movement and conveying sensation. Particle effects can be used to create magical fireballs, vortex dimensional portals, or to draw the player's attention to a glowing treasure chest.

First, I'll walk you through the individual parts of spine 2D animation for creating particle effects in Unity, and then I'll share some technical tips and tricks. Most of these examples come from my work on the Spellstone and Animation Throwdown games.

The working process

We break down the requirements into parts. The first thing I do before creating a particle effect is asking questions to determine the requirements for the effect. The answers to these questions become limitations and let me know what kind of appearance and emotional impact should be expected from the effect.

Questions might be:

  • What size should the effect be?
  • How long should it last?
  • How is the effect triggered?
  • Do I need to break it down into separate parts so that the execution time can be controlled through the code?
  • What can happen while the effect is running? How can this affect the speed of the game?
  • Does this effect interact with other objects on the screen?

Sketching the concept

Then I create a concept of what the overall effect might look like. I focus on the look and feel of the whole effect and don't really think about how I'm going to implement it yet. If the effect uses a lot of movement, then the sketch may look more like a storyboard. If the effect is static, such as a flickering aura around a magic wand, then a single sketch is usually sufficient.

Putting together a concept from several components. Most effects are created by stacking multiple components on top of each other. At this point, I start experimenting with 2d effects Unity. I've found it helpful to start with the largest element of the object and then work on the smallest, or if it's a consistent effect, I work it through from start to finish.

Testing

Effects are usually tied to the technical elements of the game, so it is very important to test the effects and iterate according to how they appear in the game. Often you have to change the duration of the effect, its scale and tempo to make it look correct when triggered. I strive to make our effects appear responsive! After I make sure everything looks right in the game, I consider the process complete.